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Jacob's Guest Podcast Appearance on Veterans In Business – Ulysses Training

Jacob’s Guest Podcast Appearance on Veterans In Business

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Get to know Jacob as he talks about his time in the military and how his service was cut short by an injury caused by a car accident, and how he used fitness to get healthy. His road to recovery is inspiring, check it out.

 

Full Transript

 

JAMES VAN PROOYEN:

Welcome back to the veterans in business show. I’m excited today to be joined by my guest, Jacob Levin of you Ulysses Training. How are you today Jacob?

JACOB LEVIN, ULYSSES TRAINING:

Man, I’m doing well. James, I’m really, really grateful that you have me on the show. It’s been a, you and I have been working to do this interview for like six months, so

JAMES VAN PROOYEN:

yeah, absolutely. And we kind of had a dry run before we had some technical difficulties with equipment and here we go. Better, better late than never as they say so.

JACOB LEVIN, ULYSSES TRAINING:

well, and you caught me right at the right time. I fly out for, uh, for Cambodia in two days.

JAMES VAN PROOYEN:

That’s awesome. So I want to start the podcast kind of giving people an idea, kind of of your background. Um, we all kind of have unique stories or interesting ways how we enter into the military. Um, Jacob, can you kind of tell us, did you have family members that were military or like how did that happen for you? How’d you go in the army?

JACOB LEVIN, ULYSSES TRAINING:

So I, I did, I had, um, a grandfather who was in the Navy, another grandfather who was in the army, uh, two uncles who were both colonels in the air force. But for me, it was actually, um, college. I was studying philosophy and I’m a big fan of a guy named Socrates. Everybody’s read some Socrates. But what most people don’t realize is Socrates was actually also a war hero. He was decorated three times, three different battlefields. And he believed that one of the greatest goods that you can do in your life is to serve the state. And as we know, he was eventually poisoned to death by the state. But up until the moment he died, he believed he was still serving this country. And that narrative really inspired me. He was a man who was very critical when he believed that, that his people were going in a bad direction. But he was also a man who was always willing to put himself on the line and stand up for what he believed to be right. And, um, I went from my first year in college as most freshmen in college are being incredibly, incredibly, incredibly liberal to still being incredibly liberal, but feeling that I owed it to myself into my country to at least put my money where my mouth was and that’s why I joined.

JAMES VAN PROOYEN:

Was there any kind of, why’d you choose army? Was there kind of any choice between certain branches or like some kind of job that you were looking for? What, how did that happen for you?

JACOB LEVIN, ULYSSES TRAINING:

You know, that’s uh, the story gets, um, weirder the deeper you get. So I was born with one kidney. My initial plan was to join the Marine Corps. In fact, I interviewed with the company commander of the recruiting Depot. I was going to go to Marino CS. I went to Marina OCS or I went to the recruiting company commander and when he realized that I was going to need a medical waiver, we did our best. And South Carolina NEPs was like, Nope, one kidney, you’re out. Forget it. So I ended up moving to San Antonio, Texas and trying again about a year later, and I walked into an air force recruiting station because let’s face it, they’re the smartest branch to join if you have any brain cells in your head. But I obviously didn’t have any brain cells in my head because they told me it would be a six month waiting period. And I walked out and walked into an army recruiting Depot and applied for army, OCS and was shipping off to basic in like three months.

JAMES VAN PROOYEN:

So the air force was actually, so you couldn’t get in the Marines with one kidney, but you could with it in the air force was okay with that as well. That’s interesting.

JACOB LEVIN, ULYSSES TRAINING:

So it’s actually a, it’s the MEPS station that determines who gets the waiver and who doesn’t. Okay. And that’s across all branches, but it’s located by state. So South Carolina doctors were like, no God, that’s insane. We would never take a dude with one kidney. And Texas doctors were like, yeah, whatever. I mean it was really just luck of the draw. So I go to OCS and, or I go to basic training, I go to OCS. And the reason I chose the infantry was I loved it. I mean, I, I’ve had a few weeks playing in the mud and basic and I’d had a few weeks playing in the mud and NCS and I, if I remember correctly, I was number like 15 or 16 out of the a hundred odd people that were about to choose their branch. And so I had a pretty good selection of branches available to me. I mean, intelligence was on the board. Artillery armor was certainly still on the board and they all seemed like really fun options. Everybody told me I’d be a bad infant Sherman and I loved it. And so that’s what I wanted to try to be. And so six weeks through OCS, you stand up and you choose your branch. And that’s what I did.

JAMES VAN PROOYEN:

So what was your career like? How, how many years did you do in the army and kind of what was some highlights of that?

JACOB LEVIN, ULYSSES TRAINING:

well, it turns out everybody was right. I was actually really bad at being an infantry. I started two and a half years. I was medically discharged, uh, not because of anything exciting. I was, uh, I had graduated OCS and was snowbirding before reporting to my —– it and I got into a car accident and I spent the next two years, um, filling in various executive officer roles and then I was medically discharged and that’s it. My career was short. Non-eventful

JAMES VAN PROOYEN:

so what was that kind of thought process where you was, was that, I mean, do you like, okay. Time to move on as cool or what was your kind of thought process during that time here?

JACOB LEVIN, ULYSSES TRAINING:

Um, man, that was probably the hardest period of my life. Uh, hands down. I appealed it all the way up to national level. I went to San Antonio support st mucin and as I told the review board, like, look man, I don’t care what job you give me. Like I will be a mechanic, but there’s no reason to just kick me out. So I, you know, I can’t carry 130 pound pack because I have spinal issues. Cool. Like there’s be a job and I couldn’t understand why they wouldn’t transfer me to another branch. Um, obviously, you know, it’s not the army being a Dick, it’s just the army doesn’t need broken lieutenants. And so the math didn’t work out for them.

JAMES VAN PROOYEN:

So then when you were kind of coming out of that then, what was your next thought of, Hey, what am I going to do? Like what, what was that journey like as you were getting out and then,

JACOB LEVIN, ULYSSES TRAINING:

well, I knew I needed to get my back healthy again. I was always a pretty fit guy and to not be able to walk more than 800 meters without sciatic pain was just unacceptable. So I moved to Missoula, Montana and I found a guy who ran a CrossFit gym there, but also specialized in injury rehabilitation and massage. He had gone to the Olympics as a massage specialist for the athletes. I was like, this dude sounds pretty legit. So I moved to Missoula, Montana. I started working with a guy named Dan Carney. And in a year I was running, sparking sprints and in two years I was running Spartan bees. And there was a lot of work that went into that, but I did manage to heal myself and I spent five years out West, uh, wrapping up as a wild land firefighter. You know, I needed to do something like I didn’t get to be an infantry man, but frankly, wildland fire is probably in a lot of ways, a much cooler job.

JACOB LEVIN, ULYSSES TRAINING:

And I got to do that and my back was good enough that I got through it. And then, uh, yeah, it was a long journey, man. It was. And throughout all of this, of course I was developing my own relationship with fitness and, um, understanding how it in a lot of ways saved my life. I mean, James, when I, when I say that, that was a bad period in my, in my life, man, let’s talk about oxycodone and painkillers and uh, and beard, you know, it’s, uh, it’s a rough mix. I was sleeping on the floor of my living room at Fort Benning, Georgia because I couldn’t, it hurt too much to sleep in a bed like I, my back was just too terrible. So it, it was a mental and spiritual journey as much as it was a physical one to be able to be healthy. Again.

JAMES VAN PROOYEN:

As you look back at that, going through that process, did that make you better? We kind of kind of through learning how to heal yourself that way and maybe come back stronger even possibly.

JACOB LEVIN, ULYSSES TRAINING:

Uh, I hope so. You know, I named my business Ulysses Training because of a poem by Alfred Lord Tennyson and Tennyson says at the end of the poem, uh, we are not now that strength, which in old days moved earth and heaven, that which we are, we are one equal temper of heroic hearts made weak by time and fate yet strong and will to strive to seek to find and not to yield. And when I was injured there was a really big question in my mind like, am I going to be able to, to fight mentally? Is it, is the mental part of my willpower gone? Because you know what, what did I have to measure it against? There were no challenges that I was allowed to, to take on. And slowly, you know, over over the next several years, I had to, I had to realize that just because I’m no longer or never really was the greatest infantry man in the world, that there were still things that I could get out there and tackle.

JACOB LEVIN, ULYSSES TRAINING:

And so, yeah, I think in a way it did make me better. It certainly, um, certainly made me more resilient, uh, when I faced setbacks. Now I don’t, or I guess I never really did, but I know now better that I can get through them because I’ve done the deep shame and the deep humiliation of being discharged that early in the military career shapes you and it can shape you several ways. It can, it can be the guy who drinks in bars claiming that he was so special forces, uh, you know, his missions are still classified or you can just own it and be like, this happened. It was really disappointing. I still love working with veterans. I still love trying to shape the lives of other people and realize that I can still make a very powerful impact on the world around me.

JAMES VAN PROOYEN:

I love that you mentioned that Jacob, cause I think a lot of times, so I did 20 years in the air force, I was joined in a joint communications, I was at T and a joint communications unit and you know, I think a lot of us become, you know, you’re such kind of in, in the day to day from one deployment to the next and you know, so I think we, we don’t know is really think about the people that don’t get to serve like that and you know, maybe cast judgment on like, Oh you just did this or I or I even meet people and they’re like, Oh I only did four years or I was only a reserve as their only guard. Right. So, but really that makes up the whole team anyway, number one. Number two, it’s, I think a lot of times what we ended up doing later after our, whatever time that is in the military, that really does a little bit better at defining us. I think. So I love that you mentioned that and kind of how you turn that into an, you know, maybe a negative into a positive and, and continue to draw from that for what you’re doing.

JACOB LEVIN, ULYSSES TRAINING:

I appreciate you saying that and that’s actually, um, you know, it’s one of the catalysts for starting my own business for starting a fitness business in particular. I want not just myself, but other people who have gone through these things. I just had a conversation with a woman recovering from a terrible car accident and I can feel the emotion and the frustration, but she wasn’t able to do the things that she used to be able to do. And it’s important to note that we’re not defined by our limitations. It’s important to be able to not just say that out loud, but to actually know it to be true. You know? Yeah. Stuff happens. We were all dealt horrible setbacks in 20 years in the military. You probably have a collection of, of setbacks that could have defeated you at any, any given point, but you chose not to be defeated every single time. And every single one of those choices was an active decision that you make. And we can make those decisions every day of our lives.

JAMES VAN PROOYEN:

Love that. And then I think that’s a great, if nobody takes away anything else from this conversation, I think that’s a great takeaway in itself. And I actually reminded, you know, other people that have had on the podcast that kind of have similar stories and so many, you know, if you’re having another day, you know that you can make, make a difference and make a new decision and totally start over no matter what setbacks come. Um, you know, and there’s just so many examples of that in the world that we see. So I love that you kind of have used that for you. And I’m so Jacob’s kind of tell us how the business kind of came to be like, did you know right away when you were younger you wanted to have a business of some sort or just over time as you saw what was happening for your results? Does that, what inspired it?

JACOB LEVIN, ULYSSES TRAINING:

When I was a 20 years old, I was cleaning bathrooms at a gym called Carolina CrossFit. And I knew at 20 years old that I really wanted to own my own gym someday. And then I started scrubbing the toilets and I started seeing the work that the owner and the manager put in every day cleaning the floor, wiping down the medicine balls. Do I really want to do that? But I love fitness, you know, and I, I really love making an impact in people’s lives. And so over the past 10 years, I’ve hunted for ways to make that my reality. I’ve worked as a personal trainer. I’ve managed a CrossFit gym. I’ve done operations for four different gyms in Manhattan. At the same time I’ve handled payroll. I’ve, I’ve wanted all the aspects, I think of the fitness business. Uh, from the personal trainer to the, to running the books.

JACOB LEVIN, ULYSSES TRAINING:

And what I found in the end was what I really wanted to do was I wanted to reach as many people as possible in a way that they could afford it. Look, anybody can afford you a membership. I’m not saying that, but when I was a personal trainer, I charged $120 an hour a session. Now not many people can afford to work with me at that rate for five days a week. And therefore they’re losing out on a number of opportunities and they’re sacrificing a lot of things in their life, even to work with me the two times a week they could typically afford. So I did a lot of thinking about it and I was pretty skeptical about the whole online training business. Like, can I really actually impact someone’s life this way? And I saw some very good examples of guys doing that.

JACOB LEVIN, ULYSSES TRAINING:

And I attended a course called the online trainers Academy that took me months to complete. And it was all about how to build systems to make sure that your clients succeed. And so as I learned more and more about this, I realized this is, this is where it’s going to be. This is the way I can do this because I can afford to charge a lot less than a hundred dollars an hour and I can afford to give my clients five days a week of programming, six days a week of programming access to me to answer their questions. Is it slightly lower than uh, you know, getting to work with a personal trainer every day. Yeah. But nobody can afford to do that anyway. And I can afford to work with a lot more people and shape a lot more lives than if I’m looking at filling a Monday morning time slot and everybody wants to be there Monday at eight. well now I’ve just had to turn down four clients. Tough luck. So I don’t really know if I’m answering your question, but it’s been an evolution. Um, I landed on this after a lot of soul searching and after a lot of trying other tasks in the fitness world.

JAMES VAN PROOYEN:

Well, I think he did. And I think what I take away from what you said is you kind of went after something that you enjoy doing. Fitness. You talked about that being part of your healing process anyway and so you at a young age were kind of paying attention. Well you’re young now too, but younger age you were kind of going and learning from the ground up and you were looking at what’s out there, something I want to do and learning from kind of going out there and doing it, getting some training, take, taking the time and doing the work that it takes to do it and you know, learning what, what you saw of what you wanted to do. So I think those are, those are takeaways I kind of get from Karen that and just remembering a lot of mentors and the things I’ve learned from the keys to what you want to do or out there. Like there’s people already kind of doing similar things and you know, you don’t have to recreate a lot of that. You can actually just go copy what they’re doing.

JACOB LEVIN, ULYSSES TRAINING:

And you know, something that I don’t think has said enough and that I know, you know, the big guys out in our business world are usually very happy to help you. Uh, there’s a guy named John Berardi, he founded precision nutrition. He’s on the board of Apple, was like their health advisor, smart guy. John Berardi doesn’t view me as a threat. You know, I’m not a competitor at his level. He’s been incredibly generous with his time, not just with me but with hundreds of people, maybe probably thousands of people because we’re not having to reinvent the wheel and the entire industry, and this is probably true in every industry, the entire industry thrives when the level of people participating in rise. So, you know, I’ve learned from the best because they want me to do well. They need me to do well in order for the whole, for the industry to grow.

JACOB LEVIN, ULYSSES TRAINING:

And I think, um, anyone’s thinking of starting a business should know that you’re not, you’re not out there creating systems that aren’t already in place. There are already in existence. There is help out there and you can find help from some of the most surprising places because again, you’re never going to be the guy competing with the of Apple. Probably you might be could happen, but probably not, which is why he wrote a book teaching you how to do the things that he’s done because he knows darn well that he can afford to be generous with his time. Take advantage of these people, pay for the business calls with, with the smart entrepreneurs. And if you’re thinking about, if you’re listening to this and you’re thinking about starting your own business, start by looking at what resources are out there because there are a surprising number of them.

JAMES VAN PROOYEN:

Yeah. And I love even, you know, not just learning from other people. There’s possible collaboration. I’m sure you’ve seen some of that in the fitness space and there’s plenty of ways that similar things people and entities can work together as well and that, you know, kind of help each other and, and give business to each other and things like that. So

JACOB LEVIN, ULYSSES TRAINING:

I’m a wholehearted believer that if you’re not promoting other businesses, you’re doing it wrong. You should always be.

JAMES VAN PROOYEN:

What’s been some obstacles that you’ve had to overcome maybe as you started, which this is probably your first business, I’m assuming. So

JACOB LEVIN, ULYSSES TRAINING:

this is my first business. Number one is learning how to sell. I mean, it, it’s really scary and it feels almost dishonest, right? To like go out and tell people that they should buy your product. It feels greedy and you have to learn, uh, internally that what I’m doing has value and this guy’s not gonna buy it if he doesn’t think it has value. I’m not doing anything wrong by trying to sell my product. Uh, that was the biggest obstacle for me. Uh, wanting to talk to people in an authentic, genuine way and not feel kind of like a dirt bag. I know everyone talks about this, like this is a very common problem, but it was my biggest obstacle from there. I think the sec, the other big one for me was learning to build systems to get organized, especially as a sole proprietor. It was a guy running his own show. I had to build a Google calendar that really reflected the amount of work I needed to be doing every day because I’ve got Netflix in my, in my living room. It’s very easy for me to fall off the wagon so to speak. Staying organized is was the hardest thing I had to teach myself. And again, it’s what everyone told me like no matter who I spoke to you though, you got to step one is to build systems man. Like get organized, schedule your day.

JAMES VAN PROOYEN:

well and I love that you say that too because I think also it’s one of those things, a couple of things I think of entrepreneurship where I liked that part of it where you kind of reap the rewards of your work, like almost a hundred percent where there’s not a lot of places to be like well you know this person’s, you know, my boss is holding you back or this thing, you know, every, you own all of them. And I like that. You know, it’s kind of pro-con but you kind of a double edged sword I guess maybe where you know, you’re it, it’s a good measurement, right? You can’t, you know, you know, yeah, you might have maybe a bad business idea or you just need to kind of shift a little bit and you kind of really do it to learn that and you still learn things and I don’t really believe in failure anyway when you’re doing that kind of thing. But we’re still in business. That’s really what I like about it is you can create these things and how, how you Scutter your time, you know, you, you’re the one that determines that. But you really, you know, I think when you do have systems you can kind of measure and see, okay, this is working. I need to change this one. Maybe adapt a better system, a better procedures and stuff like that for, for that. And you can really measure it.

JACOB LEVIN, ULYSSES TRAINING:

And I love that you say that you can’t blame it on your boss and that’s, that’s so true. But yeah, I can, I can, but that really just means I’m blaming on me or in my case I can get frustrated with my clients because they aren’t doing the work. And yeah, every now and then I was like, ah, I wrote this beautiful thing. Why aren’t you doing it? But again, that that’s not really their failure. I mean, isn’t my job to guide people through the things? If I’m not doing my job, how can I expect them to get your things done?

JAMES VAN PROOYEN:

So tell me a little bit about what’s your kind of the core part of your business. Like what are your offering you? Have you kind of gradually offered more or what’s the kind of baseline of what?

JACOB LEVIN, ULYSSES TRAINING:

So I had gradually offered more. I started offering a nutritional consultation and a nutrition curriculum and I got this from John barardi’s, precision nutrition. I went through the certification course and I at first thought that this would be the only thing I could really offer effectively online. Since then I attended the online trainers Academy and I started working with people as a personal trainer online. And that’s become really the core of my business. I developed a training blocks in month long periods based on our intake discussions and on our check-ins. And at the end of every month we have a conversation, you know, Hey, how’d this go? Where do you want to go next? And then we build the next one. And of course throughout this period we’re communicating and we’re, we’re staying in touch and I’m checking out their workouts, making fun of them a little bit when they, I don’t make fun of them. No, you know, just doing the things that a coach does. But that has become the centerpiece of what I do.

JAMES VAN PROOYEN:

If someone’s kind of interested in to learn more about what, what your business is, are you, what’s the best place for them to go? Check, check what you’re doing now.

JACOB LEVIN, ULYSSES TRAINING:

They should go to www.ulyssestraining.org and that’s U-L-Y-S-S-E-Straining.org. They can contact me directly from there and I will respond within the day.

JAMES VAN PROOYEN:

So I want to ask you, are you someone that reads books? Are you a reader at all?

JACOB LEVIN, ULYSSES TRAINING:

Lately. I’ve been in the audio book kick, but only because my apartment in New York city is about the size of a car. Uh, I have too many books as it is. And by too many, I mean like 20, like I’m out of room.

JAMES VAN PROOYEN:

What’s a good book that you’ve been reading lately? Maybe on the South of mountain side or business side.

JACOB LEVIN, ULYSSES TRAINING:

A changemaker by John Berardi was just came out earlier this year. It’s been amazing.

JAMES VAN PROOYEN:

well, so business has been talked about kind of as maybe your entrepreneurship, being a grinder. There’s days, I’m sure you get up and you don’t really feel like doing what you have to do. What is something that you do, Jacob, to push through that?

JACOB LEVIN, ULYSSES TRAINING:

Every morning before I leave my bedroom, I meditate. I spend 10 minutes setting up my day by going through a meditation routine. And then the very first thing I do is I pick up my laptop. I walked out of my bedroom and I go upstairs to my apartments, little business lounge area, and I check my emails. But I don’t do that in my apartment. And I think for me that’s critical. My bedroom is also my living room, you know, I have it. It is very easy for me if I sit around here to just not leave it, to not do anything. The way that I pushed through the Dion, we, the grind is a, I get out of a place where I’m uncomfortable and I go just like I’m going to the office.

JAMES VAN PROOYEN:

I think you talked about this earlier, but if you had to say maybe your biggest thing you’ve learned so far, if you were going to kind of have one piece of advice based on what you’ve learned in business so far, what would that be?

JACOB LEVIN, ULYSSES TRAINING:

Reach out to people who are already doing it. Buy them a cup of coffee, pay for a business call, provide value to them in return, but don’t be afraid to ask them for help or for advice. And I think you’ll be shocked at the eagerness people will express to help you. Not everyone, but almost everyone I’ve talked to has been amazing.

JAMES VAN PROOYEN:

That’s awesome advice. Jacob, what’s, what’s the one thing you’re kind of most excited about and maybe in the future of what you’re getting ready to do in the next six months of business?

JACOB LEVIN, ULYSSES TRAINING:

So my hope is that in the next six months to a year I will be working with a former Buddhist monk in the nation and the kingdom of Cambodia. Uh, incorporating, helping him incorporate fitness into his mindfulness retreat. And from there I would like to begin hosting fitness retreats, uh, probably by next year. That’s my dream. That’s where a big part of where I’m going.

JAMES VAN PROOYEN:

How did that opportunity present itself? Cause I was gonna actually ask as a follow on, but you answered that question kind of of why are you going to Cambodia right now? So w how did that come to be?

JACOB LEVIN, ULYSSES TRAINING:

So I have a very, very good friend and a very smart businessman, um, who has been going to Cambodia for years and he goes for a couple of weeks to this town, see Emery, which is where I’m going. And he does business all over Asia. But he said, Jacob, if I could live anywhere, I would go in and see him. And so this idea got into my head and I sit in touch with Tony. Uh, his name is Tony gamble is lives out in Montana. I’ve stayed in touch with him over the years and when I told them that I was going to Cambodia for a two week vacation, he said, Oh, well there’s this guy you gotta meet and put me in touch with a former Buddhist monk named known CHONY, who if you, if you were able to spell his name and Googled it, it would be the first three pages of Google are dedicated to this guy. He’s a big deal. I didn’t realize he was such a big deal when he and I first spoke, because he’s the nicest humblest and kindness guy I’ve really ever had a conversation with. And shortly after we started talking, he said, Hey, would you be interested in helping me with this? And I said, yeah, right away. Right. And so that’s what I’m going to do.

JAMES VAN PROOYEN:

And I look forward to kind of hearing the next part of your journey. And your next chapter. So maybe we can have you on the podcast in the future to talk about that at the end. I want to leave you a Jacob and opportunity. Maybe one last thing to leave us with or a place as somebody, I know you gave us her website, but is there, you know, maybe social media, Instagram or something like what’s the other, what’s another good place for someone to reach out to you?

JACOB LEVIN, ULYSSES TRAINING:

So I’m also on Instagram at, at Ulysses Training and of course I’m on Facebook. Um, either Jacob within or Ulysses Training on very active on both pages. You’re more than welcome to friend me there. If I have one thing to leave you guys with, it’s very easy to discard fitness as a tool for entrepreneurship. And what I would like to stress is that a person who is physically fit as well as mentally active is going to do better than a person who is either simply physically fit or simply mentally active. If you want to be an entrepreneur, you need to go out there with all the, all the cylinders firing, get yourself healthy, learn how to care for yourself. Because as you said earlier in this podcast, the buck stops with you. If you’re not feeling well one day and you failed to make a sale, there’s going to be no one on your team to pick that up for you. So I can’t stress enough the importance that I’ve found in staying physically healthy as well as mentally alert.

JAMES VAN PROOYEN:

That’s great advice. Thanks you so much, Jacob. I appreciate your time today and I’m glad we got the funding to do this and then enjoy your trip to Cambodia.

JACOB LEVIN, ULYSSES TRAINING:

Thanks man. I’m really appreciative he worked me in and, uh, I will keep you posted.

JAMES VAN PROOYEN:

Thanks.

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